Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Exit Interviews Are Important

IMG_1192Being a consultant to CPA firm management, I hear a lot of stories. If you work in a firm, you can just imagine. Many of them sadden me, yet many also bring me joy. This is a “what was he thinking?” type story.

A firm administrator performed the usual exit interview with a departing employee. The employee was not fired, he left after several years building his career at the firm. Many of the remarks made by the exiting employee, according to the firm administrator, were fairly critical, yet true. When the comments were reported to the partners, one partner stated, “We don’t care what Joe thinks, he never did get with the program.”

Exit interviews can be very beneficial to both the firm and the person departing. Employees leave for a reason. Finding out why can help you plan for changes that need to be made.

  • Employees quit their boss, not their job.
  • Employees leave when they lose confidence in their leaders.
  • Employees leave because of issues with workplace culture.
  • Employees leave because they don’t see opportunity for career advancement and growth in compensation.

The person conducting the interview should be experienced in crucial conversations with employees, follow an established process or checklist. The interview should be conducted in a truly caring and non-threatening manner. Remember, the employee will most likely be dreading the interview and needs to be put at ease.

After you gather information from exit interviews, take the comments seriously and determine what actions need to happen to make your firm a place where talented people want to stay and build their careers.

  • "And now, gentlemen, like your manners, I must leave you."
  • Dylan Thomas

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