Archive for the ‘Partner topics’ Category

Thursday, June 7th, 2018

Important Survey

“We are drowning in information but starved for knowledge.” – John Naisbitt

My friends at ConvergenceCoaching®, LLC, are committed to helping firms succeed through the adoption of NextGen strategies, including flex. They are seeking participants in their Anytime, Anywhere Work™ Survey 2018.

The goal of this survey is to collect data on the adoption of flexible work programs (Anytime, Anywhere Work™ programs) by public accounting firms and the experiences firms have had with these initiatives.

Follow the link to find out more and please consider participating in the survey. The survey is open through June 15. By participating you will receive a copy of the survey results.

  • It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.
  • Arthur Conan Doyle

Tuesday, June 5th, 2018

Client Acceptance

“The first step toward change is awareness. The second step is acceptance.” – Nathaniel Branden

A potential new client calls and wants to meet you and possibly hire you and your firm. You are thrilled – a new client!

More and more potential clients are contacting you via your website to inquire about services. You are thrilled – a new client!

They come into the office for a complimentary first meeting. This is where you need to be careful and not be so thrilled.

They talk and talk. You talk and talk. Before you know it you have given them a couple hours of FREE consultation. Because you are a nice person and want to help people you have also probably given them valuable advice on their financial situation without them becoming a client.

Many people who contact you, are not a suitable client for your services. Don’t invest too much time upfront.

Yes, put the word out there that you offer a free one-hour consultation for prospective clients. But, establish a script for that first meeting to learn more about them so you can decide whether they are a suitable candidate for your firm. Don’t accept clients that do not fit your criteria for an “A” client. Your expertise is not a fit for everyone. Invest one hour, no more until they sign the engagement letter.

The establishment of a valid billing and collection policy begins with client acceptance.

  • Acceptance doesn't mean resignation; it means understanding that something is what it is and that there's got to be a way through it.
  • Michael J. Fox

Tuesday, May 29th, 2018

We Are So busy

“Never mistake activity for achievement.” – John Wooden

I love the above quote and it is something that I think applies to CPA firm citizens.

I hear it all the time:

  • We are so busy.
  • No one has time to help me.
  • I hesitate to add new clients because I can’t ask the staff to work more hours.
  • And, many similar statements.

I also see it all the time. A huge amount of talking, debating and worrying with very little actually being accomplished. I observe it often in my coaching clients – lots of talk and excuses (we were too busy) and little achievement.

Analyze what you are so busy doing. The best thing you can be doing, no matter what level of staff you are (or partner), is to focus on developing others. Delegate to them and get yourself out of the busy-work and focus on achieving something bigger.

  • Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort.
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

Thursday, May 24th, 2018

Bringing In New Partners

“The price of greatness is responsibility.” – Winston Churchill

Recently, Marc Rosenberg contributed an article to CPA Practice Advisor titled 7 Must-Haves for Accounting Firm Succession Plans. 

Rosenberg notes that 80% of first-generation firms never make it to the second generation because they have non-existent or ineffective succession plans.

If you want your firm to survive into the future, choosing the right partners is an important step. Often, owners make someone a partner without them truly understanding the expectations and responsibilities of a partner. Firms also often make someone a partner just because they don’t want them to leave the firm.

In his article, Rosenberg kindly shares his one-page list of criteria for promotion to partner. You can download it here. Be sure to read his entire article. Thanks for sharing, Marc.

  • Ninety-nine percent of all failures come from people who have a habit of making excuses.
  • George Washington Carver

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

To Act is Hard

“To think is easy. To act is hard. But the hardest thing in the world is to act in accordance with your thinking.” ~ Goethe 

Read the above quote again.

Many CPAs working in public accounting will soon be participating in their firm’s annual partner, management or firm retreat.

You will THINK and explore many great ideas.

I urge you – act in accordance with your thinking.

  • You will never plow a field if you only turn it over in your mind.
  • Irish Proverb

Monday, May 21st, 2018

Performance Feedback

“Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” – Francis of Assisi

For many firms, it is the time of year when you begin your performance feedback sessions. Hopefully, you have modified and updated your methods over the last few years. While some firms have theoretically eliminated the annual performance review, it is certainly not dead yet.

If you use the same format year after year after year, your employees and those who are giving them feedback come to dread the entire process.

Sometimes partners are expected to give feedback to 7, 8, 9 or more people. That takes a lot of time. The bigger issue is, after all the preliminary information gathering is done, how you structure the actual feedback face-to-face meeting.

One step in the right direction is to have more performance conversations throughout the year and not put so much focus on the big, annual evaluation.

Another modification is to work with your partners and managers in learning how to provide more meaningful feedback. Historically, managers have focused on past performance rather than talking about the future. Managers have also tended to focus on weaknesses rather than strengths.

Work to identify each individual’s strengths. Then, build momentum and career progression on those strengths. Develop a system of more frequent conversations and down-play the dreaded annual review.

 

  • If we did the things we are capable of, we would astound ourselves.
  • Thomas Edison

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

The Partner Pledge

“Individual commitment to a group effort – that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.” – Vince Lombardi

I have talked with many firms about the use of a partner commitment statement. It is a list of things that a person commits to when they become an owner (partner) in a CPA firm. The first example I ever saw was from Sam Allred of Upstream Academy.

Over the years I have encouraged all firms to establish some guidelines for partners to follow. In so many firms, it is a sort of “now I am a partner so I can do whatever I want” culture. Progressive firms are setting the expectation for partners and I think it would be helpful to all partner groups.

Thanks to the CPAFMA discussion board, I recently read a sample Partner Pledge shared by Scott Chicoine, Firm Administrator for KerberRose, a prominent Wisconsin firm. They have kindly agreed to share their Partner Pledge with all of you. Thank-you, KerberRose!

kerberrosecclogo01

 

 

 

 

 

PARTNER COMMITMENT PLEDGE

Mission:
To Make our Clients and Employees Successful

Core Values:
• Honesty
• Integrity
• Respect
• Balanced Life
• Community Orientated

As a Partner of KerberRose, S.C., I understand that partnership is a privilege and not a right…this privilege must be continuously earned. I have a responsibility to KerberRose, the Partners, and the team members. As a Partner, I understand that I am on display for all to see and serve as a role model. My effort, attitude and desire will serve as a constant point of reference for employees. As such I pledge to:

-Commit to the Core Values of KerberRose in all interactions with all of The Firm’s Team Members
-Make myself more valuable every year and strive for continuous improvement
-Ensure the perpetuation of KerberRose through the transfer of knowledge and talents to future firm leaders
-Support firm efforts to develop and train future firm leadership
-Foster a culture that promotes inclusivity, family values, and opportunity for team members
-Continually engage with Team Members… be accessible, show them they are valued and help them to achieve their goals
-Be a great role model for success and judgment… be an inspiring Partner
-Make myself available for meetings with Firm Administrator and Managing -Partner to help monitor my personal goals and firm goals
-Delegate as appropriate, giving proper direction and setting reasonable expectations
-Commit to a unified and cohesive Partner group, but allow for creative thinking and challenging the status quo
-Commit to spirited involvement rather than grudging compliance
-Act in a modest manner and set ego aside
-Promote the full offering of available services to clients and prospects
-Ensure the services I offer are beneficial to clients
-Understand that we should provide clients exceptional service
-Always put the business interests of KerberRose ahead of my personal business interests
-Use my best efforts to meet or exceed my new business goals on an annual basis
-Use my best efforts to attain both chargeable and non-chargeable goals each year
-Establish non-chargeable hour goals that enhance the future of KerberRose
-Prepare billing timely and fairly
-Follow established collection policies and requirements of Partners
-Record my time daily
-Always give my best attitude, effort, and desire
-Make a lifelong commitment to learning

I, ________________________________have read, understand, and agree to do my best to approach my daily work in accordance with this KerberRose Partner Commitment Pledge.

 

  • Unless commitment is made, there are only promises and hopes... but no plans.
  • Peter Drucker

Wednesday, May 16th, 2018

Participate In The Rosenberg Survey

“Knowledge is power.” – Francis Bacon
I eagerly look forward to the release of the Rosenberg Survey each year. I use it extensively in my consulting work. Now is the time for your firm to fill out the survey and participate.
Here’s the information to that you can take part:
THE ROSENBERG SURVEY – SURVEY NOW OPEN
For two decades, The Rosenberg Survey has provided accounting firms with key benchmark statistics.
Did you know?
The Elite Firms from our 2017 survey (firms with income per partner > $500k) had the following metrics:
  • Ratio of staff to equity partner – 8.6 (vs. an average of 5.1 for firms with fees between $2-10 million)
  • Net fees per equity partner – $2,180,000 (vs. an average of $1.2 million for firms with fees between $2-10 million)
  • Charge hours for professional staff – 1,510 (vs. an average of 1,492 for firms with fees between $2-10 million)
Why is The Rosenberg Survey Valuable?
  • Customized comparison of like-sized firms in similar markets for participating firms.
  • Accurate and valid results reviewed by three CPAs.
  • Reliable year to year comparison with a return rate of 82% from previous year’s participants.
  • Robust pool of participants of nearly 350 firms makes our data relevant to firms of all sizes.
  • Clear cut data displayed by firm size for comparison.
 
The deadline to participate is July 16th. (Thank you to those firms that have participated thus far.)
  • Information is a source of learning. But unless it is organized, processed, and available to the right people in a format for decision making, it is a burden, not a benefit.
  • William Pollard

Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

Maybe There Are Too Many Reruns

“I do not like to repeat successes, I like to go on to other things.” – Walt Disney

Interesting post by Bill Carlino of Transition Advisors last week about the value of the numerous conferences that are held each year targeted to those work in or with the CPA profession.

Already, and it is just mid-May, I have observed (via Twitter) numerous conferences and meetings focused on educating CPAs on many of the same, recurring topics I have listened to for years and years. In addition to the re-run experience, it is very expensive to attend these conferences. While CPA firm administrators, new to the profession, obtain huge educational value from their national practice management conference, many partners refuse to spend the money to send them.

Take a minute or two to read Carlino’s post. Great post, Bill!

  • Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress, but I repeat myself.
  • Mark Twain

Thursday, May 10th, 2018

Words of Wisdom from a Succession Planning Panel

“It is better to live rich than to die rich.” – Samuel Johnson

At the BDO Alliance conference, the Succession Planning panel was comprised of Marc Rosenberg, Jay Nisberg, Carl George and Bob Lewis. It’s important for you to keep tabs on current trends in the succession area and tweak your own plan as the years go by.

Daniel Hood, Editor of Accounting Today tweeted some great comments from the panel. I have selected a few for your contemplation.

  • Lewis: The first thing to do is look at the gaps – financial gap (can the successors support the retirees?), the talent gap (who can bring in work), the strategy gap (do you know where you want to be in 5 years?)
  • Nisberg: Too many Baby Boomers don’t see the people coming up behind them as having the same strengths they have. I assure you, they do – you just have to trust.
  • Rosenberg: Partners need to have a show-down meeting: When do they want to retire? What do they want from it? It’s a hugely emotional issue.
  • Nisberg: Vision is critical – highly successful firms have a vision that is the culmination of the will of the partners – where they want to go and how they want to get there.
  • Rosenberg: 80% of 1st generation CPA firms don’t make it to the second generation.
  • George: If you don’t put succession planning in partner goals and the compensation system, you will be stuck in the mud.
  • Lewis: It’s important that staff know there’s a succession in place.
  • George: A surprising number of firm leaders don’t understand the business of public accounting.
  • Lewis: In many firms, staff doesn’t understand firm revenue, the actual size of the firm. How can they operate in the dark?
  • George: Start teaching staff the business of public accounting on Day 1 – while you’re onboarding.
  • Rosenberg: Get everyone in the firm to understand how the firm works and how it makes money. That needs to happen at CPA firms. Partners are much too secretive.
  • Rosenberg: Staff doesn’t have a clue how much partners make – give them an idea because it’ll be higher than they expect.
  • Lewis: If a non-equity partner isn’t willing to convert to equity, then you don’t really have a partner.
  • Nisberg: I don’t understand why so many firms rush to M&A when there are so many other options.
  • George: I’m very happy to see more women than ever running firms — and they’re doing a great job.
  • Golf is played by twenty million mature American men whose wives think they are out having fun.
  • Jim Bishop