Archive for the ‘Recruiting’ Category

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

It’s About Culture. How To Make Your Team Feel Special

lumsden1There are some firms that just “get it. For several years now I have admired how Lumsden McCormick, in Buffalo, appreciates their people and goes that extra step in developing a culture of inclusiveness and career advancement.

Recently, I noticed this Facebook post:

Congratulations to two Lumsden McCormick newlyweds!

Pat & Amanda (Moses) Meyers and Robert & Jillian Torella were married on the same day – September 17!

It’s a little thing, but I bet it made these two couples feel special.  Lumsden McCormick also always posts about people passing the CPA exam and other life events. Check out their Facebook page. Be sure to notice the Recruitment Open House post.

What’s your firm doing?

lumsden2

  • I was married by a judge. I should have asked for a jury.
  • Groucho Marx

Friday, August 26th, 2016

Attracting The Millennials And Others

IMG_7704“Great vision without great people is irrelevant.” – Jim Collins

Everyone wants to work for a firm that “gets it.” If you can create that special culture within your CPA firm that really understands today’s current workforce, you will be a winner.

While millennials are the focus for most firms, it involves other team members, too. Experienced people will leave firms that are stuck in the past and move on to a high-profile firm with a vibrant culture.

LBMC, headquartered in Nashville, is a shining example.

Be sure you read this article from Accounting Today: The Millennial Riddle.

  • If you think hiring professionals is expensive, try hiring amateurs.
  • Anonymous

Saturday, August 6th, 2016

Lighten-Up, It’s The Weekend – Jim Henson

“Life is meant to be fun, and joyous, and fulfilling.”- Jim Henson

Yesterday, I blogged about getting The Right People on your CPA firm bus.

No one did that better than Jim Henson.

Each summer (spring, fall, and winter, too), I encourage you to READ. Not just CPA stuff! Read fiction and non-fiction for enjoyment and inspiration.

I am currently reading Jim Henson: The Biography by Brian Jay Jones. Henson had a knack, skill, aptitude, whatever you want to call it for finding and hiring the right people. He also said, “The beauty of nature has been one of the great inspirations in my life.” 

So, do three things this weekend – read, take a walk, and…. Lighten-up this weekend and enjoy The Swedish Chef making a banana split.

  • Please watch out for each other and love and forgive everybody. It’s a good life, enjoy it.
  • Jim Henson

Friday, August 5th, 2016

The Right People

“Good is the enemy of Great.” – Jim Collins

You have all heard the Jim Collins‘ advice from his book, Good to Great:

You are a bus driver. The bus, your company, is at a standstill, and it’s your job to get it going. You have to decide where you’re going, how you’re going to get there, and who’s going with you.

Most people assume that great bus drivers (read: business leaders) immediately start the journey by announcing to the people on the bus where they’re going—by setting a new direction or by articulating a fresh corporate vision.  

In fact, leaders of companies that go from good to great start not with “where” but with “who.” They start by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats. And they stick with that discipline—first the people, then the direction—no matter how dire the circumstances.

I work with and talk to hundreds of CPAs in public practice every year. Few, if any, started their firm this way. Few manage their firm this way now.

Sure, many firm leaders talk about “the bus” scenario and tell me “we are working on it.” In reality, inside many firms are sacred cows. People the firm is not willing to fire. Maybe fire is too harsh a word. Most people who are trouble-makers, dissenters, whiners, unwilling to change just simply need to be coached into a new position with another firm or company. It can be done gently and maybe even slowly, but don’t shy away from doing it if you want your firm to leap into the future.

Read this article, Good to Great, by Collins on his website if you haven’t read the book.

  • The team with the best players wins.
  • Jack Welch

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

Personality Profiles

“Personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald

Many firms use personality profile testing as part of their hiring process and also as a means to help current employees assess their own performance and identify a focus for future goal-setting activities.

The first time I took one of these profile tests it was a group activity for our entire firm (every person) after we acquired another firm. At the time our firm was much smaller. Combined, we had about 30 people. It was part of a half-day event so that everyone could get to know each other better. It was actually very helpful and a lot of fun. I really enjoyed learning more about myself!

We used the DISC profile and the results were presented at our group meeting by a trained DISC facilitator.

Of course, you have many to choose from and I have taken several types over the years…. Predictive Index, Meyers-Briggs, etc.

If you’re not familiar with these profiles and considering them for your firm, here is a good article from my friends at HireMax3 Reasons Leadership Experts Recommend DISC.

If you’re not familiar with the DISC, you may wonder what all the fuss is about. And even if you’ve taken a DISC assessment before, you may not have realized how powerful it can be in helping you reach your business goals.

D = Dominance

I = Influence

S = Steadiness

C = Compliance

 

  • Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it.
  • Bruce Lee

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

An Important Step In Staff Development

“Mentoring is easy and natural; it does not have to be just another dreaded task on your to-do list.” – Rita Keller

Thanks so much to Accounting Today and Sean McCabe for featuring many of my comments in the article, Molding the Future of the Profession – Mentoring young staff should be a crucial part of the recruiting and retention toolkit of more accounting firms.” 

Follow the link to read the entire article. And, thanks to Edi Osborne for all of her great comments in the article.

Here are some bullet point highlights:

  • Mentoring is just as important as salary and technology.
  • Mentoring requires an investment of time and money.
  • It is about attracting and strengthening future leaders for the profession.
  • Young people will buy into the vision of what it means to be a CPA and stay in the profession longer if they make a solid connection with someone who has already been down that road.
  • CPAs are great at teaching young people the technical skills but fail to impart knowledge about relationship-building and career-building skills.
  • Showing and not telling is vital to the mentor-mentee relationship.
  • Effective mentoring has become a strategic focus for the most progressive and successful firms.
  • You have to water the flowers you want to grow.
  • Stephen Covey

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

Digital Tools Are Part Of Onboarding

“The future depends on what you do today.” – Gandhi

It’s a new world and if you are not keeping pace, your new hires will notice immediately.

It is also a digital world and online activities and resources are such an important part of your firm. Keep this in mind as you overhaul your orientation process. Orientation has evolved into onboarding and onboarding is a process that can last up to a year or more.

I believe that first impressions STILL make a difference in how you are perceived. I always stress this with students aiming to make accounting their career.

While a prospective employee strives to make a good first impression, the firm is also being viewed with a magnifying glass. Be aware of the first impression your firm is making with prospects. I still hear horror stories of new hires arriving on their first day and it seems like almost a surprise. Their cubicle is not ready, they have no computer, etc.

To move from orientation to onboarding, begin with automating all of the initial paperwork. Most of it can be completed online before the new hire even arrives at the office.

Next, review what a new hire experiences in their first year. How can you make it more enriching? How can you convince the new hire that their career development is a top priority? You are probably doing many of the necessary things to help them succeed but you have not formalized it and communicated it very well.

Young professionals want to know immediately what their career path will look like and what it takes to succeed at the firm.

  • Share the steps involved for initial training.
  • Explain the formal CPE they will receive during the first year.
  • Communicate how the Guide, Coach, Mentor, and Sponsor Program works and what it means to them during the first year.
  • Provide an explanation of all of the firm’s services.
  • Explain how they will rotate through working in many types of service areas.
  • Explain how they will rotate working with a variety of people – partners and managers.
  • Provide them job descriptions for all levels of staff at the firm.

This is just a beginning list. Determine all of the activities, assignments, and learning experiences that a new hire will experience at your firm. Now is the time to rebrand from orientation to onboarding.

  • Whether you think you can or you think you can't, you're right.
  • Henry Ford

Monday, July 25th, 2016

Attract and Develop

Tom Hood, is that you with Rita?Maybe you have noticed, recruiting and retaining efforts have become even more intense and complicated.

No longer are recruiting and retaining enough to guarantee that talented professionals will want to come to your firm and remain there to build their professional career.

Tom Hood, President & CEO of the Maryland Association of CPAs, tells us that in this fast changing world we have moved from an environment of recruit and retain to a strategy of attract and develop.

So, keep this in mind: Recruit and Retain no longer applies, it is now Attract and Develop.

For years, I have been urging you to make your firm a talent magnet. My long-standing advice has evolved from “you should” make your firm a magnet for talent to “you must” make your firm a magnet for talent. Develop your strategy now to create an “I want to work there!” kind of firm.

Here’s a short video clip from Tom Hood that describes how talent strategies have changed.

 

  • If you're young and talented, it's like you have wings.
  • Haruki Murakami

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

Updating Your Branding

There are a lot of new trends in public accounting. You have read about them here on this blog, in my newsletter and in various publications and blogs for CPAs.

Of course, there are also new trends in other disciplines that affect public accounting. Branding for example.

Per HR Bartender, employment branding is disappearing. Employment branding and consumer branding are being merged together to form ONE company brand. That strong brand will be used to attract and retain clients and employees.

Many firms have done a great job of building a firm brand but most do still have sub-categories under that one brand to attract clients and future employees.

Building ONE brand can serve three purposes: Attract new clients, attract employees and make current employees proud to be part of the firm.

Maybe your brand is unclear, split, confusing or even non-existent. Check out this article on HR Bartender and view the video example from Go Daddy. It is a brand that stresses lots of things, including hard work!

Here’s an excerpt:

If I’m a customer, I know exactly how GoDaddy is going to support me and my business. If I’m a candidate, I understand the GoDaddy culture – the everyday hard work that’s expected to keep customers’ business dreams alive. And if I’m an employee, I’m proud to be a part of that success. One brand. One video. For multiple audiences.

  • You can't get there by bus, only by hard work and risk and by not quite knowing what you're doing. What you'll discover will be wonderful. What you'll discover will be yourself.
  • Alan Alda

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

They Accepted Your Offer – Begin Onboarding Immediately

“Human Resources isn’t a thing we do. It’s the thing that runs our business.” – Steve Wynn

We all know the talent wars are raging in public accounting. You have identified a top student and you landed them. They have accepted your offer. Begin the onboarding process immediately. After all, you not only want to hire the best and brightest, you want to RETAIN them, long-term. Onboarding is different from orientation. Orientation is the formal, get me signed-up, type activities. Onboarding is a year-long process to facilitate a new hire’s success and build a positive working relationship with the firm and other team members.

Here are some little things you can do, as part of onboarding, that can make a big difference. Let’s say the candidate/new hire is named Robert and he’s finishing up his last year of college.

Send a gift basket to his parent’s home welcoming Robert and his family to your firm’s family.

Provide an advance on Robert’s salary ($1,500 or so) to buy new clothes, to use for a deposit on an apartment or down payment on a new car.

Connect with Robert immediately via social media. He probably already has an online presence. Use it to introduce him to all of the firm’s online communities and keep him connected to people at the firm while he awaits his actual starting date.

Have his Guide text him periodically just to touch base.

Let technology handle many aspects of onboarding. Let Robert complete all of the hiring paperwork online. This is not only what young people are used to; it is what we have all become comfortable with.

 

  • The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.
  • Theodore Roosevelt