Archive for the ‘Talent’ Category

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Employee Engagement Matters

“Paychecks can’t buy passion.” – Brad Federman

It is getting to be a rather tiring topic. To be successful, you must have employees who are engaged. You can Google the topic and find all kinds of advice.

The fact is, there is an overwhelming amount of people who are not engaged in their work. To me, that means they really don’t like what they do. Per Gallup, you have Three Types of Employees:

Engaged employees work with passion and feel a profound connection to their company. They drive innovation and move the organization forward.

Not-Engaged employees are essentially “checked out.” They are sleepwalking through their workday, putting time but not energy or passion into their work.

Actively Disengaged employees aren’t just unhappy at work, they are busy action out their unhappiness. Every day, these workers undermine what their engaged coworkers accomplish.

My motto, on this topic as it is with most things inside a busy CPA firm – – Keep It Simple

Where do your people fit? I’m sure you have some in each classification. To drive engagement, it’s simple, you have to be proactive.

  • Be sure your people know what is expected of them.
  • Let them know how important they are to the success of your clients and your firm.
  • Make sure you explain to them how their career can, or will, advance.
  • Give regular feedback so that they know how they are doing and where they are going.
  • Be a caring boss.
  • Over communicate
  • Set a good example
  • Have a sense of humor

If you do some of these things and are proactive maybe your “Not-Engaged” people will become Engaged.

For the Actively Disengaged, give them the opportunity to get a new job elsewhere.

  • Research indicates that workers have three prime needs: Interesting work, recognition for doing a good job, and being let in on things that are going on in the company.
  • Zig Ziglar

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

Parental Leave

“Trust yourself. You know more than you think you do.” – Benjamin Spock, M.D.

A few months ago I surveyed a small number of CPA firms across the country. I was curious about the kind of parental leave they offered as an employee benefit.

To my dismay, paid maternity leave is almost non-existent. CPA firms seem to approach it with a combination of actions. The employee (the mother) is encouraged to save and/or carry over PTO to be used and they combine it with short term disability options.

As far as any type of paid leave for new Dads, it seems truly non-existent.

Here is a good article from FAST Company – How Paid Parental Leave Changed in 2016. 

Some progress has been made, in general, but 2016 was not an impressive year for paid parental leave. A quarter of new mothers go back to work just 10 days after giving birth.

Just so you know, in 2016, EY announced a new policy to expand its parental benefits to over 35,000 U.S. employees. Both new mothers and fathers are eligible for up to 16 weeks of fully paid parental leave for birth, adoption, surrogacy, foster care, or legal guardianship.

If you want to attract and retain young, top talent. An impressive paid parental leave policy might just be the answer.

 

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

Motivate By Individualizing

“The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.” – Walt Disney

The Golden Rule, which is a good rule, for the most part, doesn’t always apply in today’s complex workplace environment.

Not everyone wants to be treated like “I” want to be treated.

These days training and development are all about, “One size fits one.”

The Association for Talent Development explains it this way: One size fits one is a movement toward providing learning to employees, clients, or children in a way that makes sense to the learner and not to the trainer, teacher or instructional designer.

CPA firm managers are often not very in-tune with the best ways to motivate and engage the people they supervise. In many CPA firms, everyone is trained the same and it is often a very long-standing aspect of the firm culture. Also, accounting firms do not spend enough money on educating and training their managers on how to manage PEOPLE.

One size fits one, acknowledges that people are motivated by immensely different things. For example, one person loves to be recognized publicly and another dreads being the center of attention.

Qualified managers (and partners) are good at understanding people and they adjust their supervisory style accordingly.

 

  • Don't let yesterday take up too much of today.
  • Will Rogers

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

Five Workplace Trends For 2017

“Perseverance is the hard work you do after you get tired of doing the hard work you already did.” – Newt Gingrich

As you already know, nearly every CPA firm is looking for new talent. It’s truly turned into a war for talent in the public accounting profession.

It’s not just public accounting, of course. According to Glassdoor’s newest report on job trends, there is a record number of unfilled jobs – 5.85 million as of April 2016 – which represent the most since BLS started tracking job openings in 2000.

Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor’s chief economist, shares some 2017 job trends:

#1 HR will transform itself into “people science.”

#2 Many things get automated but we don’t lose our jobs.

#3 Nontraditional benefits will become less popular.

#4 We’ll make progress narrowing the wage gap.

#5 The Gig economy will slow down.

Read more about each trend here. I know you will be interested in #3!

  • No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt

Monday, January 9th, 2017

The Modern Workplace

“The only way to do great work is to love what you do.” – Steve Jobs

It is definitely not the same old workplace where many of us “grew up” in the business world.

At my first job, in the accounting department of a major manufacturing company, we were not allowed to leave our desks except at our specified “break” time. They ran the office much like they did the manufacturing floor.

60Minutes and Vanity Fair conducted a poll in 2016 to explore the modern workplace. It has changed dramatically and is still evolving as we deal with more tech-savvy young workers who have joined our knowledge-based economy. They are demanding more.

Here are the polling questions:

What’s the most important thing to look for in a new job?

What’s the best way to keep an employee motivated?

Which business practice would you most like to bring back?

How much more than their workers should CEOs earn?

Which job perk would be the hardest to explain to your grandfather?

Which industry is the most unethical?

What is the worst thing about your job?

Check out the results here. Maybe you should ask some of these questions to your own accounting firm team. As a firm leader, you need to know all you can about your young workforce.

  • Diamonds are nothing more than chunks of coal that stuck to their job.
  • Malcolm Forbes

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

The Growing Area of Flexible Work Arrangements

Many firms have incorporated flexible work arrangements into their menu of offerings to employees. Some have been much slower to adapt.

Here’s an update from a non-profit organization called 1 Million For Work Flexibility. To keep your CPA firm competitive you need to learn all you can about the flexibility options available to talented professionals.

Here are some of the top moments of the year for flexibility listed below.

  1. New Hampshire became the second state to make it legal for workers to request work flexibility. New Hampshire has an aging workforce and demographic. State Senate Bill 416 encourages younger workers to stay in (or move to) New Hampshire and work there so they can enjoy a flexible work arrangement that allows them to care for their growing families as well as their aging parents without worrying about bosses who might fire them for asking for flex. The bill’s sponsor believes that this isn’t just good for working parents and families, but for the overall state economy. New Hampshire follows Vermont with this type of “right to request” legislation, as well as the city of San Francisco.

  1. New York City passed the Freelance Isn’t Free Act, which is said to be the first of its kind protection for freelancers. It requires written agreements for the timeline and payment of freelance work, with penalties for employer violations.

  1. More companies, industries, and occupations are now offering flexibility to their employees. These 250 companies are shining examples of work flexibility in action. This list of the top companies with the most flexible job listings since 2013 (the “FlexJobs 250”) is based on an analysis of more than 40,000 companies and their flexible job posting histories in the FlexJobs database between October 1, 2013, and October 1, 2016.

  1. The United State of Women, a summit hosted by the White House, showcased the importance of workplace policies that work for women. The inaugural event, attended by 1 Million for Work Flexibility, highlighted work flexibility and brought together thousands of people who are working to change tomorrow for women.

  1. Work flexibility conversation focused on fathers. It’s long been clear that flexibility is crucial for working mothers, but the issue is much more broad. As part of its mission to demonstrate the far-reaching value of flex, 1 Million for Work Flexibility teamed up with supporters to co-host a special Father’s Day-themed event featuring scholar, international lawyer, foreign policy analyst, and thought-leader Anne-Marie Slaughter. The event focused on how we can shift the work and family narrative to include men and women in both corners, by valuing both care and competition, home and career in a way that benefits us all.

Launched in 2013, the 1 Million for Work Flexibility movement now has more than 100 coalition members including advocacy groups, think tanks, academic institutions, and businesses, as well as thousands of individuals demonstrating the many types of flexible work that are not only leading to happier and healthier workers, but also improving our economy.

  • Stay committed to your decisions, but stay flexible in your approach.
  • Tony Robbins

Monday, October 31st, 2016

Finding & Keeping Top Talent Sometimes Comes Down To How Many Benefits You Offer

CPA firms and many other companies are seeking talented workers. The competition is especially fierce among accounting firms.

I noticed an Associated Press story in my Sunday newspaper that headlined: Employers spice up benefits, offer help with pets, debt. I have heard from several firms that they have taken a serious look at their benefits in an effort to stay competitive. It seems that Millennials want more choice and customization while Baby Boomers want more certainty (good health and dental coverage).

Many employers are offering programs that monitor for identity theft, help with mortgage payments, assistance with repaying college loans and even unexpected veterinary bills. Many of these “extras” are offered and available but that doesn’t necessarily mean the firm foots the entire bill.

Here’s some information from SHRM:

Employee Benefits Have Exploded

  • SHRM now tracks 350 fringe benefits
  • 20 years ago it was 60 and 10 years ago it was 219
  • Most increases have been in larger corporations
  • Smaller businesses struggle to keep up
  • Biggest gain was telecommuting – in 1996 it was offered by 20% and it has grown to 60%

Maybe it’s time to review your benefit package. I have found that many firms haven’t kept pace with maternity and paternity leave programs.

  • I have found that among its other benefits, giving liberates the soul of the giver.
  • Maya Angelou

Friday, October 14th, 2016

You Were Salary, Now You Are Hourly

I imagine you have read a lot about the U.S. Department of Labor ruling that changed the overtime rules under the FLSA. The new rules go into effect on December 1, 2016.

I also imagine you have already been preparing to deal with this issue inside your accounting firm.

When it comes to converting a salaried individual to hourly status, it’s often a very sensitive area. I have heard and read, over and over again, that many people truly feel like it is a demotion.

I can remember when I first became a salaried employee. I thought I had “made it!” Over my many years of supervisory responsibility, I had numerous individuals plead with me to be put on salary. It has become somewhat of a status symbol in the workplace.

Sharlyn Lauby (HR Bartender) notes, “I know employees will not like this decision. Many organizations don’t like it either. But we have to follow the law.”

Read this blog post by Lauby, I think you will find it familiar and helpful.

 

  • How an employee is paid doesn't change their value to the organization.
  • Sharlyn Lauby

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

It’s About Culture. How To Make Your Team Feel Special

lumsden1There are some firms that just “get it. For several years now I have admired how Lumsden McCormick, in Buffalo, appreciates their people and goes that extra step in developing a culture of inclusiveness and career advancement.

Recently, I noticed this Facebook post:

Congratulations to two Lumsden McCormick newlyweds!

Pat & Amanda (Moses) Meyers and Robert & Jillian Torella were married on the same day – September 17!

It’s a little thing, but I bet it made these two couples feel special.  Lumsden McCormick also always posts about people passing the CPA exam and other life events. Check out their Facebook page. Be sure to notice the Recruitment Open House post.

What’s your firm doing?

lumsden2

  • I was married by a judge. I should have asked for a jury.
  • Groucho Marx

Monday, August 8th, 2016

What Hat Do You Wear?

My post today was inspired by one last week from Seth Godin, called Scientist, Engineer, and Operations Manager. Each one has a job to do…..

Inside most CPA firms, there are three client-facing  “jobs,” partner, manager, and staff. Each one has a job to do.

The partner is key to defining the firm vision. The partner brings in new business, keeps current clients from leaving by continually working on the relationship and finds and develops new talent.

The manager manages. Yes, they manage and review the work but a key priority is managing people. They train, coach, mentor, nurture, inspire their subordinates and build career-enhancing relationships that keep talented people at the firm.

The staff does the work. They never have to worry about having enough to do because partners and managers are making sure they are professionally challenged and are assigned to engagements that will enhance their skills. The staff work as a team to help each other make progress.

I hope you do not have partners and managers doing too much work and staffers looking for work.

  • If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.
  • Henry Ford