Archive for the ‘Crafting Your Career’ Category

Friday, September 14th, 2018

Are You a Hurdle or a Linchpin? – Flashback Friday

“When you are living the best version of yourself, you inspire others to live the best versions of themselves.” – Steve Maraboli

If you asked everyone working inside your busy CPA firm to tell you the absolute truth, would they categorize you as a Linchpin or a Hurdle?

Read more about how to become indispensable in this flashback post from November 2017.

 

 

  • If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.
  • John Quincy Adams

Wednesday, September 12th, 2018

Improve Your Writing

“I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” – Mark Twain

Accountants must be good at numbers and they also need to be good writers.

According to a recent post by Grammarly, many writers use filler words and phrases and they also use hedging words because they don’t want to appear demanding and bossy.

I am guilty of using hedging words and I never realized it. I also observe that many accountants do the same.

Here are some good examples via Grammarly:

Slightly

I’m slightly annoyed by Kate’s repeated tardiness.

Sort of, Kind of

Their plan was kind of short-sighted.

Rather, somewhat

The play was rather interesting.

Quite

His car is quite fast.

Probably

We should probably wait to send that email until we have final approval.

If you need to learn more ways to improve your writing, read the entire post.

  • Substitute 'damn' every time you're inclined to write 'very;' your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.
  • Mark Twain

Friday, September 7th, 2018

A CPA Partner’s Primary Mission – Flashback Friday

“Make each day your masterpiece.” – John Wooden

If you are a partner in a CPA firm or if you want to be a partner in a CPA firm, one simple act can set the tone for the entire culture of the firm. Set a good example.

As I talk with firm administrators, practice managers, marketing directors, HR directors and staff inside CPA firms around the country, almost all tell me that the people who do not follow the processes and guidelines are the partners.

Here is a post from 2016 about setting a good example. Are you a Dynamo or a Cruiser?

  • Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful.
  • John Wooden

Friday, August 24th, 2018

Flashback Friday – Keep Focused

“Success is nothing more than a few simple disciplines, practiced every day.” – Jim Rohn

As you become more experienced you might get distracted by various activities outside the firm. Don’t take your eye off the ball. 

Have a great week-end.

  • If you really want to do something, you’ll find a way. If you don’t, you’ll find an excuse.
  • Jim Rohn

Monday, August 20th, 2018

Adulting

“When I came into my adulthood, I recognized how fortunate I was to be doing what I loved to do.” – Laurence Fishburne

Have you heard the term, adulting? If you are a millennial, I am sure you have but older bosses might not be so savvy.

The term #Adulting is a hashtag – a social media thing and it is used often by millennials to indicate they did something an adult does, like their own laundry.

There are a lot of experts out there who have had enough of the word. They believe it is actually self-demeaning for millennials (some almost 40 years old) to use it.

Read this interesting article via Cosmopolitan titled “Shut the Hell Up About ‘Adulting’.”

Here’s an excerpt to give you a flavor for the situation:

My boss is an older Millennial who gives me a lot of responsibility at work. She trusts me to manage our interns, make sure reports are sent out to higher-ups, and that her schedule is always up to date. I’m not going to look capable of any of those things if I act like going to the grocery store alone is “adulting,” my biggest accomplishment yet. I want even more responsibility than I have now, and I’m not going to get there by acting like I need a pat on the back for brushing my teeth and showing up to work on time. 

At your firm, I hope you are always treating your millennials like adults. Talk to them about this topic. I am optimistic that most accounting degreed, younger professionals are already acting like adults.

  • Part of adulthood is searching for the people who understand you.
  • Hanya Yanagihara

Friday, August 17th, 2018

Flashback Friday – What’s In It For Me?

“You have to water the flowers you want to grow.” – Stephen Covey

If you are considering taking on the role of Mentor. Or, if you are a Mentee looking for a Mentor – what’s in it for you?

Here’s a post from 2016 that explains the benefits of both roles.

Have a great weekend!

  • To add value to others, one must first value others.
  • John Maxwell

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

You Have Dual Responsibility

“Intellectual growth should commence at birth and cease only at death.” – Albert Einstein

I have been thinking about it more lately. I have been rereading some of my old blog posts on the topic. I have always believed it is one of the most important things one person can do for another. Yes, mentoring is on my mind. It is SO important in the career growth of accountants.

Immediately, you probably agree. Mentoring is important to young accountants as they begin their career in public accounting, You are right but it doesn’t stop there.

At your firm, you might have managers and partners filling the roles of Mentor and Sponsor. You have staff members acting as Guides for recent college graduates and Seniors and Managers being Coaches for new hires. But, what about partners and other very experienced professionals at your firm? Mentoring is something you never outgrow.

If you are an experienced professional, you have a dual role – mentor and mentee. Never stop taking steps to improve yourself.

If your program needs an update, if you are just drafting a mentoring program for your firm or if the person championing your mentoring program needs advice, I offer mentoring program advisory services. Feel free to contact me for more information.

Be sure to follow me on Twitter to learn more about MAP – Managing an Accounting Practice.

  • I am not a teacher, but an awakener.
  • Robert Frost

Wednesday, August 15th, 2018

We Are Like Family – Maybe Not

“What people really want advice on is the interpersonal weirdness that comes with having a job.” – Alison Green

As I read an article via The New York Times – Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (and That’s Ok!), I definitely thought about how the article should be read by many of you working inside accounting firms.

The article is an interview with Alison Green, author of a book titled: Ask a Manager: How to Navigate Clueless Colleagues, Lunch-Stealing Bosses, and the Rest of Your Life at Work.

I have heard it over and over from firms of varying sizes over many years – “we are like family.” I have always struggled with this topic. I have seen it used to avoid difficult conversations and to justify continuing to employ a poor performer over a long period of time. I have also seen it used to make unreasonable demands like working unreasonable hours and even seven days per week.

As you work at your accounting firm, always remember that this is business, not family, no matter what some people might think.

From the author: I want people to know it’s all right to treat work like work. We’re being paid to be there, and most of us wouldn’t show up otherwise. We don’t need to pretend that’s not the case.

Employment, underneath it all, is a contractual situation. It is a transaction:  I pay you and you do the work. You pay me and I do the work.

Be sure to read the article/interview.

  • There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.
  • Colin Powell

Tuesday, August 14th, 2018

Skilled Leaders Know How to Delegate

“The really expert riders of horses let the horse know immediately who is in control, but then guide the horse with loose reins and seldom use the spurs.” – Sandra Day O’Connor

It is a common problem inside accounting firms. As people gain experience and move up the ladder – staff to senior, senior to manager, manager to senior manager, senior manager to partner – they often cling to familiar work and hesitate to delegate.

It is a big step to move from doing to leading. You want to develop successors. You need future leaders for your firm. Delegate.

I have observed that in many accounting firms, partners are doing manager work and managers are doing senior work, seniors are doing staff work and staff are looking for work.

Why not reverse this long-time tradition? Adopt a different long-time tradition used at the large national firms – push work down to the lowest skill level. Staff members are super busy, seniors are pressing managers for more challenging work and managers are managing seniors and staff and asking partners how they can lighten their load. Partners are doing consulting work, maintaining client relationships, mentoring young people and most importantly, bringing in new business.

As you gain more experience and get promoted if you don’t delegate you will soon find yourself coming in earlier, staying later and feeling like the firm cannot survive without you.

I like this passage from an HBR article – How to be a great leader, you have to learn how to delegate well.

While it may seem difficult, elevating your impact requires you to embrace an unavoidable leadership paradox: You need to be more essential and less involved. When you justify your hold on work, you’re confusing being involved with being essential. But the two are not the same — just as being busy and being productive are not necessarily equal.

As you address your workload this week, take a moment and ask yourself – How can I be more essential and less involved?

  • Trust is the glue of life. It's the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It's the foundational principle that holds all relationships.
  • Stephen Covey

Monday, August 13th, 2018

Cul de sac

“If your job is a cul-de-sac, you have to quit or accept the fact that your career is over.” – Seth Godin

Cul de sac is a dead-end street. It goes nowhere. Seth Godin talks about cul-de-sac jobs in his book The Dip.

If you are working in a CPA firm, no matter what your title, you might find yourself in a cul-de-sac job. You work and you work and nothing much happens. It doesn’t get better, it doesn’t get worse. It just is.

Get off the cul-de-sac – why invest your life in something not getting any better.

Some of you work in cul-de-sac firms. There is a lot of talk about how things will get better but nothing much seems to happen. Years pass by.

Some of you are in cul-de-sac partner groups. Same as above, lots of talk but not much really happens. Years pass by.

Move your firm and/or yourself out of the cul-de-sac.

 

  • People settle. They settle for less than they are capable of.
  • Seth Godin