Archive for the ‘Generations’ Category

Monday, August 20th, 2018

Adulting

“When I came into my adulthood, I recognized how fortunate I was to be doing what I loved to do.” – Laurence Fishburne

Have you heard the term, adulting? If you are a millennial, I am sure you have but older bosses might not be so savvy.

The term #Adulting is a hashtag – a social media thing and it is used often by millennials to indicate they did something an adult does, like their own laundry.

There are a lot of experts out there who have had enough of the word. They believe it is actually self-demeaning for millennials (some almost 40 years old) to use it.

Read this interesting article via Cosmopolitan titled “Shut the Hell Up About ‘Adulting’.”

Here’s an excerpt to give you a flavor for the situation:

My boss is an older Millennial who gives me a lot of responsibility at work. She trusts me to manage our interns, make sure reports are sent out to higher-ups, and that her schedule is always up to date. I’m not going to look capable of any of those things if I act like going to the grocery store alone is “adulting,” my biggest accomplishment yet. I want even more responsibility than I have now, and I’m not going to get there by acting like I need a pat on the back for brushing my teeth and showing up to work on time. 

At your firm, I hope you are always treating your millennials like adults. Talk to them about this topic. I am optimistic that most accounting degreed, younger professionals are already acting like adults.

  • Part of adulthood is searching for the people who understand you.
  • Hanya Yanagihara

Wednesday, August 15th, 2018

We Are Like Family – Maybe Not

“What people really want advice on is the interpersonal weirdness that comes with having a job.” – Alison Green

As I read an article via The New York Times – Your Workplace Isn’t Your Family (and That’s Ok!), I definitely thought about how the article should be read by many of you working inside accounting firms.

The article is an interview with Alison Green, author of a book titled: Ask a Manager: How to Navigate Clueless Colleagues, Lunch-Stealing Bosses, and the Rest of Your Life at Work.

I have heard it over and over from firms of varying sizes over many years – “we are like family.” I have always struggled with this topic. I have seen it used to avoid difficult conversations and to justify continuing to employ a poor performer over a long period of time. I have also seen it used to make unreasonable demands like working unreasonable hours and even seven days per week.

As you work at your accounting firm, always remember that this is business, not family, no matter what some people might think.

From the author: I want people to know it’s all right to treat work like work. We’re being paid to be there, and most of us wouldn’t show up otherwise. We don’t need to pretend that’s not the case.

Employment, underneath it all, is a contractual situation. It is a transaction:  I pay you and you do the work. You pay me and I do the work.

Be sure to read the article/interview.

  • There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.
  • Colin Powell

Tuesday, July 31st, 2018

Hiring of Accounting Graduates Is Down

“To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often.” – Winston Churchill

How will this affect your CPA firm?

Bob Dylan’s theme “The Times They Are A-Changin’” continues to apply to the CPA profession.

Acctg grad hiring down

  • If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
  • Maya Angelou

Thursday, July 19th, 2018

Beware of Helicopter Parents

“A suburban mother’s role is to deliver children obstetrically once, and by car forever after.” – Peter De Vries

Fall recruiting season is fast approaching. Your recruiting team will be on college campuses for job fairs, networking events and interviews. Beware of helicopter moms. They have been spotted roaming the halls of accounting job fairs gathering intel for their student.

Over the last several years, I have heard more and more stories about helicopter parents (almost always Moms) getting involved in the job search and actual hiring of their children by accounting firms. I know, many of you will say this is unbelievable! It’s not. It happens.

It probably begins when their younger teenager gets their first job. Maybe that first job is a fast food chain or a summer job at the local pool. Moms are protective and they check things out.

Here’s a great, short story from Suzanne Lucas @RealEvilHRLady. You’ll love the title of her post: Dear Moms, Do You Want Your 35-Year-Old Living in Your Basement? Because This Is How You Get That.

Check out this amusing video in one of my previous posts.

  • Some mothers are kissing mothers and some are scolding mothers, but it is love just the same, and most mothers kiss and scold together.
  • Pearl S. Buck

Thursday, June 7th, 2018

Important Survey

“We are drowning in information but starved for knowledge.” – John Naisbitt

My friends at ConvergenceCoaching®, LLC, are committed to helping firms succeed through the adoption of NextGen strategies, including flex. They are seeking participants in their Anytime, Anywhere Work™ Survey 2018.

The goal of this survey is to collect data on the adoption of flexible work programs (Anytime, Anywhere Work™ programs) by public accounting firms and the experiences firms have had with these initiatives.

Follow the link to find out more and please consider participating in the survey. The survey is open through June 15. By participating you will receive a copy of the survey results.

  • It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.
  • Arthur Conan Doyle

Wednesday, May 30th, 2018

Young CPAs – Start Sooner!

“Life is short, and it is here to be lived.” – Kate Winslet

If you are not a young CPA – I hope you share this blog post with young CPAs.

You are fairly new to your CPA career. You graduated with a history of good grades. You landed an entry-level job, right out of college, with a prestigious, growing public accounting firm.

Major accomplishment: You passed the CPA exam and are now a twenty-something CPA – congratulations, you have the momentum going for you!

You have been working on a variety of client engagements. You may be focused on tax and you may be focused on the audit side of things. You might be in a small to mid-size firm and have the opportunity to work in both areas and will probably soon declare your future focus.

You are focused on the work. You are getting better and better at the work. It seems the partners are happy with your technical abilities and the way you complete the work.

Wait! There is so much more to becoming a successful CPA than just knowing how to do the work. You must be:

  • A great conversationalist
  • A “reader” of people
  • An interesting dinner (or lunch) companion
  • A good speaker
  • Known as a “professional”
  • A contributor to your community
  • Good at time management
  • Good at motivating other people
  • Good at setting the perfect example for subordinates and peers
  • Thinking about the future
  • Able to change and evolve with the times and influence the firm to do so
  • And more – –

Don’t wait years and years to get started on this list. Learn the success skills as you are learning the technical skills. Life is short – get busy!

 

  • Life is short and the older you get, the more you feel it. Indeed, the shorter it is. People lose their capacity to walk, run, travel, think, and experience life. I realize how important it is to use the time I have.
  • Viggo Mortensen

Monday, April 30th, 2018

Abusing Technology

“I have so much I want to do. I hate wasting time.” – Stephen Hawking

Baby Boomer Partners complain:

Many of our staff are just looking for a job, not a career. They want to work 8:00 until 5:00, five days a week. Even while they are at work, they waste so much time on social media, texting their family and friends, and shopping on Amazon.

Millennial Staff complains:

Some partners send me emails at midnight. They also send me emails on weekends and sometimes at 5:00 a.m. I am expected to reply and it seems like I am on call 24/7.

Technology enables us to do so many things more quickly. It also allows us to use a lot of time we should be working on personal endeavors or to intrude on people’s personal time inappropriately.

Instant communication is not always a good thing. This might be a good discussion topic for a lunch and learn session. “How are we abusing the use of technology?” “What do we owe each other, as employer and employee?”

  • There's no good way to waste your time. Wasting time is just wasting time.
  • Helen Mirren

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

Define Your Firm’s Purpose – It Is Very Important to Young Workers

“People don’t buy what you do; they buy why you do it. And what you do simply proves what you believe” – Simon Sinek

In the past, when I have facilitated partner and management team retreats, I have urged them to focus on Purpose. Firm leaders struggled for years in defining their firm’s mission, vision and core values. A firm purpose was something new to most partner groups.

Firm leaders haven’t really thought about the difference between mission and purpose. A Mission is what you are trying to do and Purpose is why you are doing it.

Per a recent article via Fast Company – As Simon Sinek notes in his bestselling book Start with Why, most people know what an organization does, but few know why they do it. In other words, most purpose-driven leaders can articulate their mission–but many mission-driven leaders cannot articulate their purpose.

The article is titled: Want A Purpose-Driven Business? Know The Difference Between Mission And Purpose Young people want to work for a purpose-driven business but your purpose has to be something more than just rephrasing your business model.

There are some great tips in the article on steps you can take to connect with the WHY and purpose behind what you do.

Make this a topic of this year’s partner retreat.

  • There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it.
  • Simon Sinek

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018

The Truth About Your Legacy – An Important Message From Alan Weiss

“Just because you are over 50 it doesn’t mean you are finished.” – Alan Weiss

I am sure many of you are aware of Alan Weiss. If not, read his full bio here. When I began my consulting activities many peers recommended the first thing I should do is read his book, Million Dollar Consulting.

When I recently read the description of his new book, it definitely caught my attention. I believe many CPAs should definitely be building their legacy now. The title is, Threescore And More Applying the Assets of Maturity, Wisdom, and Experience for Personal and Professional Success.

Here is Alan’s message:

In our 40s, most of us are tied to a career that requires considerable investment to nurture and sustain. We overlook the legacy that we are—or are not—creating daily.

“Legacy” is not only what we leave to those we love when we’re gone. Our legacy is actually a daily contribution to others, and our duty is to keep adding to and improving it.

It’s poor planning to try to enhance our corporate performance the day prior to a promotion decision. It’s ridiculous to try to create a particular, lasting impression for others on your deathbed. And it’s insane to think that you can change your relationship with family on the eve of a marriage, divorce, or departure.

Are we all in agreement? The last minute doesn’t work.

We mistakenly look to the distant future for our “legacy” to take shape. But the fact is that each day we write a new page in our growing autobiography. The question is, how interesting and appealing is the book? Or is it filled with boring pages and repetitive chapters?

The horizon is closer. That distant line demarking the border of sea and sky has become more delineated, more visible, more imposing. We still have room between us and the horizon, but we realize every day there’s less of it. There’s less time. Because in our 40s, most of us have already lived far more than half of our productive life.

We go from thinking “there’s plenty of time” to “there’s still time, but for what?” We’re all familiar with the adage that no one on their death bed wishes they had spent more time in the office. But what we don’t acknowledge is that most people don’t fear death so much as they regret the things they never got around to doing.  

That’s why our book has to have new pages daily, new chapters monthly. We can’t stop the approach of the horizon, but we can fill the distance with meaningful productivity and contribution.

With Threescore and More, discover what you can do to create your legacy while the horizon is still in view. Here’s how to increase your power, not surrender it; how to improve your influence, not diminish it; how to utilize your experiences in the future rather than pine after them in the past.

Each day you have left is an opportunity to write a new page in your story.

Order before April 8, 2018 for special bonuses.

P.S. Remember—You can always make another dollar, but you can never make another minute.

© Alan Weiss 2018

 

  • Ageism is too often an accepted form of bias, even though the facts support the value of aging.
  • Alan Weiss

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

Want To Be More Profitable?

“A part of kindness consists in loving people more than they deserve.” – Joseph Joubert

Per Paul Epperlein of ADP:  Organizations with high employee engagement experience 22% higher profitability.

This is a big statement that applies to your firm. Do you really have employee engagement? You might think you do because you offer free coffee and soft drinks. You offer 9 or more holidays. You have an attractive lunch room with lots of amenities. You have a relaxed dress code and many other little things that make a big difference.

But… also per Epperlein: 60% of people leave their job due to a lack of relationship with their front line manager.

People like to feel connected to the people they work for. They want to feel like they are noticed, included and cared about by their boss.

How good are your firm’s partners and managers at building and nurturing caring relationships with your people? You might want to focus on that more this year. Make it a performance expectation.

  • The simple act of caring is heroic.
  • Edward Albert